Weekly Highlights: September 17, 2012

September 17, 2012

Things You Might Have Missed Last Week

(Highlights in legal, forensics, and electronic discovery news for the past week)

Interesting Electronic Evidence Cases

Inhalation Plastics, Inc. v. Medex Cardio-Pulmonary, Inc., No. 2:07-CV-116, 2012 WL 3731483 (S.D. Ohio Aug. 28, 2012)

The defendant inadvertently produced almost 350 pages of email. Even though, after in camera review, the court found that many of the produced materials were “within the ambit of attorney-client privilege”, the court found that privilege had been waived.

Weekly Highlighted Article

From E-Discovery Beat:

Experts Consider E-Discovery Implications of New ABA Ethics Rules Amendments

From BowTieLaw.com:

Forensically Examining a Lawyer’s Computer

Electronic Evidence News

Twitter Gives Occupy Protester’s Tweets to U.S. Judge

Court Issues 20-Year Product Injunction in Trade Secret Theft/eDiscovery Sanctions Case

Samsung Flexes Litigation Muscles at Apple Ahead of iPhone 5 Launch-Again


Part One: Simple Steps To Secure Your Client During Litigation

September 11, 2012

In the past year, there has been a distinct uptick in cases involving data breach and key logging malware- especially in family law cases. This uptick is not by anonymous, random third parties, but rather by the actual litigants in a case.

Part of the reason for the uptick is that “bugging” someone’s computer  or cell phone (electronic intercept) has gotten significantly easier. Most people can handle installing software.  Likewise with breaking into someone’s webmail, banking, or other online accounts.

Here are steps your client can take, right now, to protect their information and communications:

  • Create a List of Electronic Assets – Experience shows that, without a list, things will be overlooked.  Have your client list out cell phone, webmail, social network, and online banking accounts. In the same manner, have them list out things like wifi and home network assets.  This list is the starting point.
  • Change Passwords and Password Recovery Questions – Simply changing passwords is not enough. Password recovery questions (“What is the name of your favorite pet?”) are an easy way for someone who is familiar with your client to gain entry to their online resources.
  • Avoid Password Reuse – Using the same password for everything is a recipe for disaster. Understandably, it can be an inconvenience to use different passwords everywhere, but there are ways to make meaningful passwords that are easy to remember. Here is a full write-up on password reuse.
  • Review WiFi Security – If the opposing side in a matter was the one that set up the home wireless network, then all they need to do is be within range to join back on the network and gain access to systems or to “sniff” and view network traffic (including your client’s passwords, communications, etc.).
  • Review Joint Cellular Accounts – Depending on the carrier, joint cellular plans can give the opposing party access to endpoints in voice and text communications. Some carriers may actually have access to the content of text messages online. While TRO and data protection may prevent a direct change to the account or plan, your client may consider using a pay-as-you-go plan.

These are some simple steps that can be taken with minimal cost, and yet they will provide an immediate boost to your client’s security stance.

Tomorrow: Part 2- Simple Steps In Case of Breach

If you or your client feel that there has already been a breach, or you are facing a particularly aggressive or knowledgeable opposition, you may consider inquiring about our Client Information Security package (CISP).

The CISP is a flat-rate, full assessment of your client’s information security and includes a drop-in firewall with logging and 24/7 monitoring for intrusion attempts, malware activity, and other breach behavior.  Vidoc Razor not only will assess the security of your client, but fixes the issues identified.  All hardware is provided by Vidoc Razor.

You can find more information by clicking HERE.


Weekly Highlights: September 10, 2012

September 10, 2012

Things You Might Have Missed Last Week

(Highlights in legal and electronic discovery news for the past week)

Interesting Electronic Evidence Cases

Robinson v. Jones Lang LaSalle Americas, Inc., No. 3:12-cv-00127-PK (D. Or. Aug. 29, 2012)

The defendant was seeking to compel production of discovery in (among other things) “all social media content involving [Plaintiff] since July 1, 2008” related to the Plaintiff’s “‘emotion, feeling, or mental state,’ to ‘events that could be reasonably expected to produce a significant emotion, feeling, or mental state,’ or to allegations in [Plaintiff’s] complaint.”.

Magistrate Judge Paul Papak (Oregon) found:

“I see no principled reason to articulate different standards for the discoverability of communications through email, text message, or social media platforms. I therefore fashion a single order covering all these communications.”

Link to Opinion PDF

Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Elecs. Co. Ltd., No. C 11-1846 LHK (PSG) (N.D. Cal. July 25, 2012)

The Defendant in this case was sanctioned for the loss of relevant emails due to Defendant’s failure to follow-up with employees to ensure compliance, and the Defendant’s failure to halt the email system’s auto-delete function.  Sanctions included an adverse inference that allowed the jury to presume that the missing evidence was relevant and favorable to the Plaintiff.

Link to Opinion PDF

Weekly Highlighted Case

EEOC v. Simply Storage Mgmt., LLC, 270 F.R.D. 430 (S.D. Ind. May 2010)

This case can be very useful when dealing with social media electronic evidence matters.  It was utilized by the Oregon magistrate in the above listed case (Robinson v. Jones Lang LaSalle Americas) when forming his opinion.

The defendant in this matter was seeking production of claimants’ social networking site profiles, as well as other communications from social sites used by the claimant.

Last May, the Great State of Texas saw a similar matter that relied, in part, on the EEOC case:

IN RE MAGELLAN TERMINALS HOLDINGS, L.P. AND MAGELLAN MIDSTREAM HOLDINGS GP, LLC 
Link to PDF Document

Electronic Evidence News

State Bar of Texas Alert Says ‘Scam Artist’ Stole Nonpracticing Lawyer’s ID for Fake Website

West Let Off the Hook on Web Malpractice Claim

OJ Simpson Prosecutor: Johnnie Cochran May Have Tampered with Bloody Glove