Part One: Simple Steps To Secure Your Client During Litigation

In the past year, there has been a distinct uptick in cases involving data breach and key logging malware- especially in family law cases. This uptick is not by anonymous, random third parties, but rather by the actual litigants in a case.

Part of the reason for the uptick is that “bugging” someone’s computer  or cell phone (electronic intercept) has gotten significantly easier. Most people can handle installing software.  Likewise with breaking into someone’s webmail, banking, or other online accounts.

Here are steps your client can take, right now, to protect their information and communications:

  • Create a List of Electronic Assets – Experience shows that, without a list, things will be overlooked.  Have your client list out cell phone, webmail, social network, and online banking accounts. In the same manner, have them list out things like wifi and home network assets.  This list is the starting point.
  • Change Passwords and Password Recovery Questions – Simply changing passwords is not enough. Password recovery questions (“What is the name of your favorite pet?”) are an easy way for someone who is familiar with your client to gain entry to their online resources.
  • Avoid Password Reuse – Using the same password for everything is a recipe for disaster. Understandably, it can be an inconvenience to use different passwords everywhere, but there are ways to make meaningful passwords that are easy to remember. Here is a full write-up on password reuse.
  • Review WiFi Security – If the opposing side in a matter was the one that set up the home wireless network, then all they need to do is be within range to join back on the network and gain access to systems or to “sniff” and view network traffic (including your client’s passwords, communications, etc.).
  • Review Joint Cellular Accounts – Depending on the carrier, joint cellular plans can give the opposing party access to endpoints in voice and text communications. Some carriers may actually have access to the content of text messages online. While TRO and data protection may prevent a direct change to the account or plan, your client may consider using a pay-as-you-go plan.

These are some simple steps that can be taken with minimal cost, and yet they will provide an immediate boost to your client’s security stance.

Tomorrow: Part 2- Simple Steps In Case of Breach

If you or your client feel that there has already been a breach, or you are facing a particularly aggressive or knowledgeable opposition, you may consider inquiring about our Client Information Security package (CISP).

The CISP is a flat-rate, full assessment of your client’s information security and includes a drop-in firewall with logging and 24/7 monitoring for intrusion attempts, malware activity, and other breach behavior.  Vidoc Razor not only will assess the security of your client, but fixes the issues identified.  All hardware is provided by Vidoc Razor.

You can find more information by clicking HERE.

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